How upbeat TV star Shelly Horton mistakenly blamed the pandemic for her debilitating depression

0

When Shelley Horton’s usual cheerful demeanor and bubbly personality were replaced by endless tears and ugly mood swings last year, she blamed “2020”

When Shelly Horton’s usual happy demeanor and bubbly personality were replaced with endless tears and ugly mood swings last year, she blamed “2020”.

The then 47-year-old media personality said she went from being happy and confident to being constantly overwhelmed and upset.

“I cried every day, which is not like me because I’m usually not a Weiner,” she told FEMAIL.

“And they weren’t even small tears, they were big, fat tears full of sadness – there were days when I was so sad that I couldn’t get out of bed.”

However, what the veteran journalist felt had nothing to do with the chaos caused by the global pandemic.

It was completely hormonal and “completely normal”. Shelly experienced the beginnings of perimenopause, the “seven year period” of hormonal imbalances before a woman’s period ends.

“I had never heard of perimenopause, I thought menopause would come in my 50s or 60s and consist of hot flashes and the end of my period,” she said.

The then 47-year-old media personality said she had gone from being happy and confident to being constantly overwhelmed and upset

The then 47-year-old media personality said she had gone from being happy and confident to being constantly overwhelmed and upset

While Shelly was 47 years old when she was “brushed aside” by symptoms of perimenopause, it typically begins at 45 years of age.

“My chest was so tight from fear that I couldn’t breathe at night, but I thought it was because of the lockdown and I had just moved to the freeway so I was under a lot of stress,” she said.

It was only when her IUD, a contraceptive she had relied on for 15 years to suspend her period and often joked that she was “going to get married,” apparently failed, that she went to the doctor.

“Suddenly my period came back – but I also put it down to stress. Then it came back and I bled for 32 days straight, ”she said.

“I was completely drained from it, I just felt miserable and tired, so I went to the doctor to have it checked out.”

Shelly was shocked that all of her symptoms pointed to cancer, but after a thorough medical exam, doctors determined that she was perimenopausal.

The chatty TV star found that other women were closed to their experiences with menopause and said even her mother had little to say about it.

Noting that people were taciturn about their experiences with menopause, Shelly said even her own mother had little to say about it

Noting that people were taciturn about their experiences with menopause, Shelly said even her own mother had little to say about it

“I felt so much shame and stigma when I found out, so I didn’t talk about it either,” she said.

But after doing better research, Shelly realized that if other women didn’t start the conversation, she would have to do it.

“If the women in my life had spoken to me about it, I might have been better prepared, I just feel so informed now,” she said.

“I talked to my mom and she said a little, ‘Chin up, soldier, we’re all going through this,’ ‘” she said.

“I just don’t think we have to be like that anymore.”

What is perimenopause?

Perimenopause is the prelude to a woman’s last menstrual cycle, menopause. Perimenopause can cause symptoms similar to or worse than menopausal.

Perimenopause usually occurs in a woman’s 40s and lasts an average of 4-6 years, but it can also last as little as a year or 10 years. If you haven’t had a period, spotting, or discoloration in 12 months, you have reached menopause and are considered postmenopausal.

Source: JeanHailes Women’s Health

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS

Insomnia: Fluctuating hormones that lead to night sweats are a recipe for insomnia. You can fall asleep again quickly after a night sweat, but the quality of your sleep can be affected by these interruptions. The result? Daytime sleepiness.

Joint pain: Pain in your joints, such as B. in the knees and shoulders are something you can expect to gain weight as you get older. However, this does not happen without a reason, and menopause may be the cause.

Urination health problems: Urinary tract problems like recurrent cystitis and frequent urination can start around the time of menopause. To prevent cystitis from becoming a common problem, make sure you drink plenty of water, urinate when you feel the urge, and after sex.

Dry genital tissue and pain during sex: Dryness of the vaginal / vulva area around menopause is uncomfortable and can cause discomfort during and after sex. Therefore, it is best to take extra care of this delicate tissue during menopause.

Low Sexual Desire and Arousal Problems: Low libido and arousal issues during menopause may not be easy, but that’s no reason to ignore these symptoms. You can approach them gradually, taking gentle step-by-step steps to improve your enjoyment of sex. A good place to start is to check if anything other than menopause might be part of the problem.

Headache: The issue of headaches during menopause is very mixed – there is even good news for some women. It all depends on whether the hormone estrogen triggers your headaches. This means that some women will find relief from a headache while others find that a headache is becoming a bigger problem. Then there is migraine – a very special form of severe headache. Some women who have migraines will find that they get worse as they near menopause but then resolve after menopause.

Mood swings: Last but not least, unpredictable mood swings can be one of the frustrating realities of menopause. Feeling nervous, fearful, or angry can be severe and sudden at times.

Shelly wants women to know to watch out for symptoms of perimenopause in their 40s.

“100 percent of women go through this, we should talk about it in school and at work,” she said.

‘The older generation have to put their hands up and say,’ Hey, let me clear this up ‘.’

Shelly said men also need to be educated about perimenopause.

When the spirited redhead struggled with severe mood swings, her husband Darren Robinson “just wanted to help”.

Shelly, who calls her partner an “Earth Angel,” said after her diagnosis that he was able to remind her that her mood swings were hormonal.

“He asked if I wanted to lie down, he was empathetic and compassionate,” she said.

He, too, thought that a woman’s period “just stopped”.

When the spirited redhead was struggling with severe mood swings, her husband wanted Darren Robinson

When the spirited redhead struggled with severe mood swings, her husband Darren Robinson “just wanted to help”

Now Shelly is tackling her symptoms head on using a combination of prescription drugs and practical measures, including using a portable ventilator.

“Before the lockdown, I was having lunch at China Doll’s, I had hot flashes, so I asked the waiter to bring me a bucket of ice water and wrapped a cool napkin around my neck,” she said.

‘I will not be ashamed of myself.’

Shelly says that the fact that perimenopause lasts five to seven years is “pretty worrying in itself.”

She recommends women speak to their doctor about their symptoms so that they can transition more smoothly.

Now Shelly is tackling her symptoms head on using a combination of prescription drugs and practical measures, including using a portable ventilator

Now Shelly is tackling her symptoms head on using a combination of prescription drugs and practical measures, including using a portable ventilator

Shelly is now on hormone replacement therapy and antidepressants to help, while her sister-in-law uses Flordis supplements for a more natural approach.

“You just have to do what works for you,” she said.

Shelly has been on treatment for six months now.

“I’m 100 percent back to my happy self,” she said.

“When I have lost days, I wonder if it’s perimenopause, but then I remember that we are all allowed to have lost days.”

Shelly works with the Flordis Menopause Hub to educate women about menopause including symptoms and treatment options.

Share.

Comments are closed.